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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

4 edition of Atlas of the ancient coins struck by the emperors of the Gallic empire found in the catalog.

Atlas of the ancient coins struck by the emperors of the Gallic empire

Witte, Jean Joseph Antoine Marie Baron de

Atlas of the ancient coins struck by the emperors of the Gallic empire

Postumus, Victorinus, Laelianus, Marius, Tetricus I and Tetricus II [A. D. 259 to 273]

by Witte, Jean Joseph Antoine Marie Baron de

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  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Ares in Chicago .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Numismatics -- Gaul.,
  • Coins, Ancient

  • Edition Notes

    Reprint of 1864 ed., Paris.

    Other titlesGallic empire, A.D. 259 to 273.
    Statementby J. de Witte ; with an introduction to the Gallic empire (A.D. 259 to 273).... by Percy H. Webb.
    ContributionsWebb, Percy H. 1856-1937.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsCJ 1114 W82 1976
    The Physical Object
    Pagination4 p., [49] p. of plates :
    Number of Pages49
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21458454M
    ISBN 100890051186

    Marcus Aurelius Mausaeus Valerius Carausius (died ) was a military commander of the Roman Empire in the 3rd century. He was a Menapian from Belgic Gaul, who usurped power in , during the Carausian Revolt, declaring himself emperor in Britain and northern Gaul (Imperium Britanniarum). He did this only 13 years after the Gallic Empire of the Batavian Postumus was ended in Born: Gallia Belgica. Postumus, a commander on the Danube, took advantage of the weakened Empire and declared himself emperor. Instead of trying to march on Rome, however, Postumus set up a breakaway state in the image of the Empire proper, and for nearly nine years ruled the so-called Gallic Empire, which included modern day Spain, France, and Britain.

    Roman Coin Sets; Gallic Empire – Roman Separatist Coinage of 3rd Century; Roman Coins; Tetricus I Gallic Emperor – AD; Tetricus I Gallic Emperor – AD; Tetricus II Gallic Caesar – AD; European Share Market Outlook ; Caracalla Coins; Roman Coins – Jewelry for Women; Sovereign Debt Crisis DVD – $ + $5 Shipping.   I also have two ancient Judea coins if anyone would like to see. This first coin was struck during the time of Constantine I between the years - CE in Antioch. This second coin was struck durring the time of Constans during the year CE and celebrates the 15th anniversary of his evaluation to the rank of Caesar by Constantine I.

    For two separate but related reasons. It's somewhat incorrect to talk about both empires being “independent” - the leaders of both sought to become emperors of Rome. Both sought (unsuccessfully) not to become independent nations, but to take contr. - Explore millsandkamps's board "Rare Roman/Byzantine Gold Coinage BCAD", followed by people on Pinterest. See more ideas about Byzantine gold, Byzantine and Coins pins.


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Atlas of the ancient coins struck by the emperors of the Gallic empire by Witte, Jean Joseph Antoine Marie Baron de Download PDF EPUB FB2

Atlas of the ancient coins struck by the emperors of the Gallic empire: Postumus - Victorinus - Laelianus - Marius - Tetricus I and Tetricus II [A.D. to ] Author: J De Witte ; Percy H Webb. Although it's a bit old now (), the "Atlas of the ancient coins struck by the emperors of the gallic empire" by J.

De Witte is still a good book on the subject. Q Cucumbor, Buy Atlas of the ancient coins struck by the emperors of the Gallic Empire: Postumus, Victorinus, Laelianus, Marius, Tetricus I and Tetricus II [A.D. to V, Part II, pp. ), by Percy H. Webb by Witte, Jean Joseph Antoine Marie (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Jean Joseph Antoine Marie Witte. For all those who have inquired are there coins available of the Gallic Empire that split away from Rome. Yes. We have put together a set of four of the main emperors who ruled from France.

These are nice condition, VF/EF grade fully legible. Priced at $ a set. These are very limited. The Column On The Left Includes Our "Best of NumisWiki" Menu If You Are New To Collecting - Start With Ancient Coin Collecting NumisWiki Includes The Encyclopedia of Roman Coins and Historia Nummorum If You Have Written A Numismatic Article - Please Add It To NumisWiki All Blue Text On The Website Is Linked - Keep Clicking To ENDLESSLY.

The project Digital Library Numis (DLN) is a specialized portal and depository on open access numismatic books, journals and papers, currently available on the internet. All entries are presented with detailed bibliographic metadata, often supplemented with a brief summary.

Roman Base Metal Coins - A Price Guide (Links to Amazon, similar book on Silver coins, also available). Covers most Roman base metal (ie non Silver or Gold) coins struck between BC - AD. Features pictures of common reverse types and 's of accurate line drawings of the various Emperors. See the Book section.

Hoping he might receive assistance from the Gallic Empire, he declared his support for Postumus and even issued coins in his name. In AD Gallienus was murdered by a conspiracy of officers and the commander of the nearby garrison at Ticinum (Pavia) became emperor in his place as Claudius II.

The coins of Postumus are in my opinion some of the most beautiful coins the ancient Romans ever created. Real artists must have been worked in the mints of the Gallic empire. Welcome to This Website is a project by Sebastian Sondermann, and will be continuously developed.

The Gallic Empire, lasting from the revolt of Postumus against Gallienus at Cologne AD to the Campaign of Aurelianus against the Tetrici AD at Châlons-sur-Marne, is one of the most interesting periods in ancient roman imperial history.

This is a genuine ancient Roman bronze coin struck during the reign of Gallic Emperor Tetricus I. Tetricus I and his son Tetricus II, are almost unique in Roman history, as being defeated by a rival emperor, pardoned and allowed to live out the rest of their lives in safety.

The Gallic Empire (Latin: Imperium Galliarum) or the Gallic Roman Empire are names used in modern historiography for a breakaway part of the Roman Empire that functioned de facto as a separate state from to It originated during the Crisis of the Third Century, when a series of Roman military leaders and aristocrats declared themselves emperors and took control of Gaul and adjacent Capital: Colonia Agrippina (Cologne) (–).

This thesis presents a new systematic arrangement of the coinage of the Gallic Empire as the basis for a revised edition of Roman Imperial Coinage. The coinage of all denominations, gold, silver and bronze, are unified into a single structure of issues. InPostumus revolted against the Roman emperor Gallienus and took control of the : Jerome Mairat.

In the Gallic Empire there were fewer emperors, but they still have seven in only 14 years. Postumus was the most successful Gallic emperor, staying in power for 9 years.

Coins minted during Postumus’ reign maintained a higher level of silver than in the Central Empire – between and most radiates minted in the Gallic Empire had c.

Although not the only gold coin struck by the Romans, the aureus (more properly, aureus denarius) was the standard gold denomination valued at 25 denarii. As with the denarius, the aureus became a venerable denomination; introduced by Sulla during the Republic, it was struck until the beginning of the fourth century AD under the Empire.

The coins of Postumus, the founder of the ‘. Olshausen, E., “Imperium Galliarum – the ‘Gallic Empire’ (AD –)”, in: Brill’s New Pauly Supplements I - Volume 3: Historical Atlas of the Ancient World, English edition by Christine Salazar (). Original German-language edition: Historischer Atlas der antiken Welt.

This is a genuine ancient Roman bronze coin struck during the reign of Victorinus. Victorinus was the third emperor of the rebel Gallic-Empire that briefly took control of Britain, Gaul and Spain.

He was an able soldier who rose to power under Postumus, the regimes founder. Implicated in the death of its second emperor, Marius, he assumed the. For more information about Ancient Coin Grading read this entry in our Resource Center's Ancient Coin Guide, "How are Ancient Coins Found and Preserved?" Affordable Relics- Ancient Coins.

As ancient coin expert Harlan Berk notes, ancient coins were the world’s only currency for a very long period stretching from B.C. to A.D. Author: Louis Golino. Tetricus I Antoniniani - Complete List.

AGK (corr.) includes the corrections of Marcus R. Weder (M. Weder, Münzen und Münzstätten der Gallisch-Römischen Kaiser, Teil I & Teil II, ), which are essential for using this book. This page is primarily for coins of tribes without their own page on wildwinds, or for uncertain tribes.

BMC var: Celtic Gaul. Caletedou. Quinarius. 1,70g. Stylized helmeted head of Roma (or Hercules with lionskin headdress?) left / Stylized horse left, traces of legend above, circle with K-line symbol below. SLM ; cf BMC Text. The Gallic Empire: separatism and continuity in the north-western provinces of the Roman Empire, A.D.Parts J.

F. Drinkwater Franz Steiner Verlag Wiesbaden, - History - pages.For some Roman coins the ancient name of the denominations are unknown. Antoninianus is a modern name for the double denarius denomination (taken from the real name of Caracalla, who created the denomination).

Antoninianus ( - ). The antoninianus is a Roman double denarius coin denomination (pl. antoniniani) struck from to A.D. (or if you consider the later issues.

The Gallic Emperor Marius (Ruled for 3 Days) Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by Aethelred, the chronology of the Gallic Empire is a confusing rat's nest of conflicting information. When I was a kid learning my Roman Emperors and the dates that they ruled it was reckoned that Postumus reigned from ADthat Laelianus and.